National Minority Health Month

April is recognized as National Minority Health Month, a time to raise awareness about the health disparities faced by minority populations in the United States. This year’s theme, Be the Source for Better Health: Improving Health Outcomes Through Our Cultures, Communities, and Connections, is about understanding how the unique environments, cultures, histories, and circumstances of racial and ethnic minority and AI/AN populations impact their overall health. The Black Physicians of Utah strive to promote health equity and reduce health disparities. We do this by collaborating with community partners and allies, discussing relevant health issues in public forums, providing resources in a culturally sensitive manner, and providing mentors and financial support to Black students who want to pursue a career in medicine. To learn more about National Minority Health Month and ways to take action, visit the Office of Minority Health website here.

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Sandra

Meet Pharmacist, Dr. Sandra Omotilewa! Background: Dr. Omotilewa was born in Liberia West Africa, and migrated to the United States with her parents at the age of 11 years old. She studied microbiology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and graduated from MCPHS University School of Pharmacy in 2017. Dr, Omotilewa has worked as a retail pharmacist, a clinical consultant pharmacist, an inpatient and outpatient clinical pharmacist at the Salt Lake VA Center. Dr. Omotilewa is currently an RPH advisor, working as a contractor at CVS Caremark.  Question #1: What made you want to become a Pharmacist? Answer: I chose to become a pharmacist because I was born in a country where access to adequate healthcare and medications was a significant challenge. I witnessed the impact of limited access to healthcare especially essential medications on individuals and communities around me. This experience sparked my interest in healthcare specifically pharmacy as a means to address healthcare disparities and contribute positively to improving health outcomes. Also, The notion that something as small as a medication could have such a profound impact on a person’s physiology intrigued me . Overall, Pharmacy offered me an avenue to contribute to healthcare in a unique way that makes a meaningful difference in the health and life of others. Question #2: What is one piece of advice you’d give to Black students pursuing a career in medicine? Answer: I’d say they should have clarity on their “why” or their purpose for wanting to pursue medicine because it is that “why” that will motivate and propell them through any challenge or obstacle they may come across on their journey.  Question #3: What does being part of Black Physicians of Utah mean to you?Answer: Being a member of Black Physicians of Utah is a profound opportunity to be part of a collective effort aimed at dismantling health disparities in underserved communities. It means using my skills and knowledge as a pharmacist to advocate for equitable access to healthcare. It means being a part of a team with a shared vision. A vision that is geared towards helping improve the health outcomes of those who need it the most in our community. 

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Dr. Erica Baiden Discusses Mental Health at Work

Fox 13 News discusses mental wellness in the workplace with Nikki Walker and Dr. Baiden. Dr. Baiden emphasizes the importance of de-stigmatizing getting help and talking about your mental health. Death by suicide decreased in white population, but has continued to rise in the Black community, especially in males.  

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